mothernaturenetwork:

Cowboy toilet paper: Mullein grows in every U.S. state and can often be found along roadsides and in fields and meadows. The entire plant is covered in fine, downy hairs, and mullein’s big, soft leaves are a good substitute for toilet paper — in fact, it’s often called ‘cowboy toilet paper.’
10 remarkably useful plants you can find in the wild

mothernaturenetwork:

Cowboy toilet paper: Mullein grows in every U.S. state and can often be found along roadsides and in fields and meadows. The entire plant is covered in fine, downy hairs, and mullein’s big, soft leaves are a good substitute for toilet paper — in fact, it’s often called ‘cowboy toilet paper.’

10 remarkably useful plants you can find in the wild

74 notes

dianaandpansson:

Mullein
Verbascum thapsus

"This magic herb has been protective in various cultures. In ancient Greece, Ulysses defended himself from Circe’s magic with mullein. In the old days in France, people would pass sprigs of mullein through a fire on St. John’s Eve (better known among us as Midsummer) in order to protect cattle from sickness caused by sorcery. In England, putting mullein under the butter churn could bring back butter that had been witched away. European travelers carried mullein or stuffed it into their shoes to protect them from attacks by wild animals (and also to make walking more comfortable). Nowadays, dream pillows are stuffed with mullein to protect against nightmares. It is mixed with dill, salt, and fennel and sprinkled around haunted areas to repel malicious spirits or ghosts, and it is a substitution for graveyard dirt in the recipes of various spells.
 This magic herb also has various connections to the idea of returning, which we can see as a Saturnian power (emphasizing borders and staying inside them). For instance, in Great Britain it was used to help bring back children who had been kidnapped by fairies. Various Native Americans knew a good thing when they saw it and used this Eurasian native that became naturalized in North America to return people to their right mind. For instance, the Hopi mixed the leaves with osnomodium to be used as a smoke by crazy people and those who had been betwitched. The Navajo wrapped the leaves in a corn husk to be smoked to help a mind return if it was lost, and the Potowatami smudged unconcscious people with the leaves to help them return to consciousness. Consider mullein useful in centering the spirit and add it to the pipe smoked as an aid to astral work. 
Mullein was also a ceremonial smoke for the Isleta and Thompson Indians. I read mention in various sources on the web that mullein is one of Woden’s Nine Herbs, but looking the actual charm, I don’t think so. 
Many disagree about the planetary correspondence of this magick herb. Agrippa said it belonged to Mercury. The leaves do have a high concentration of aluminum, a Mercury metal, and in the past this herb was given to affect the mind, for instance, to bring back people who were unconscious or who were mentally ill. Culpeper thought it was a Saturn herb, on account of its medicinal actions. As a biennial, it is also a slow herb (slowness is a Saturnian quality),  taking a year to produce a rosette of leaves and only flowering in the second year. The seeds likewise show a Saturnian slowness in their long viability - up to 35 years. It also has a Saturnian love for borders, growing along roads, train tracks, or on the edge of woodlands, and for areas that are rejected for agricultural purposes (“waste lands”). Some argue that it is a Fire herb, because its dry leaves make an excellent tinder and it gets one its common names, hag’s taper, from the practice of dipping the stalks in fat to make a quickie torch (by the way, the “hag” in “hag’s taper” was originally the word “hedge”). Finally, the leaves contain iron and the fuzz that covers them is a softer version of prickliness, so this can also be viewed as a Mars herb. Indeed, it has played a part in various Mars-ruled activities, such as hunting: Navajo hunters rubbed a tea of mullein leaf on themselves and their horses for strength.
 In ancient Rome, women used mullein flowers to give their hair yellow highlights. It’s said that Quaker women, who were not allowed to use makeup, rubbed their faces with the leaves to make them rosy - the fuzz is irritating to some people. The Atsugewei rubbed their bodies with mullein leaves during sweat lodges. The Abnaki made a necklace for teething babies from the root. A tea from this herb is slightly sedating; boil 1 tablespoon of dried leaves or root (or for a sweeter tea, the fresh or dried flowers) in 1 cup of water for 5-10 minutes, then strain through a coffee filter to remove the hairs, if using the leaves. The leaves were smoked in the past to soothe irritation caused by coughing from TB, asthma, or general lung irritation. The leaves also contain a small amount of rotenone, an organic pesticide. Birds enjoy eating the seeds. This plant has many, many names: it is also known as Aaron’s rod, Adam’s flannel, beggar’s blanket, beggar’s flannel, beggar’s stalk, big taper, blanket herb, blanket leaf, bullock’s lungwort, candlewick plant, clot, clown’s lungwort, cow’s lungwort, cuddy’s lungs, devil’s-tobacco, duffle, feltwort, flannel leaf, flannel plant, fluffweed, graveyeard candles, great mullein, hag’s taper, hare’s beard, hedge-taper, ice leaf, Jacob’s staff, Jupiter’s staff, lungwort, lus mor [great herb], miner’s candle, mullein, mullein dock, old man’s flannel, Our Lady’s flannel, Quaker rouge, rag paper, shepherd’s club, shepherd’s staff, St. Peter’s staff, torches, torchwort, velvet dock, velvet plant, white man’s-footsteps, wild ice leaf, witch’s candles, witch’s taper, woolen, and wooly mullein.”
– Alchemy Works 
"Mullein protects and controls: it also causes penis captivus. Against Enemies, Wild Animals, and Demons: Keep a packet of mulleinunder the pillow to prevent nightmares. Wear the leaves in your shoes or bathe for five days in mullein tea to engender courage and drive away enemies or wild animals. When burned with a mixture of Psychic Vision Incense and Commanding Incense, mullein smoke is a powerful adjunct to casting spells against foes. Mullein mixed with graveyard dirt and red pepper appears in some recipes for Goofer Dust, which is used to jinx enemies.
Magical Candles To Control Demons: If you lack candles, dip mulleinstalks in oil or tallow and bum them as a substitute. Mullein grows quitetall and is magically potent, so a circle of six-foot-tall “witches’ candles” isconsidered of assistance, if you are summoning spirits into an outdoor circle, for if the spirits can be conjured, the circle of smoking mullein torches will bring them under your command. and you can rule them.
To Catch an Adulterous Lover: If you suspect your partner of having another lover. get a short length of mullein stalk and keep it on you. When your lover urinates outdoors, stick the mullein stalk down into the pool ofurine and leave it there. If someone else has intercourse with your lover. thepair will get stuck like dogs, and you will be able to catch them in the act.
Medical uses: Mullein is used in herbal medicine to relieve asthma.Botanical Notes: Some European-American authors and unscrupulous merchants have claimed that mullein is a legitimate substitute for graveyard dirt, which it absolutely is not. Mullein is powerful in Its own right, and cansupplement graveyard dirt, but It was only introduced to African people inAmerica, while veneration of the dead is endemic in African religions, and thus working with graveyard dirt, “corpse powder:’ and the bones of the dead is of important and ancient provenance in African-American religio-magical traditions.”

– Catherine Yronwode, Hoodoo Herb and Root Magic

dianaandpansson:

Mullein

Verbascum thapsus

"This magic herb has been protective in various cultures. In ancient Greece, Ulysses defended himself from Circe’s magic with mullein. In the old days in France, people would pass sprigs of mullein through a fire on St. John’s Eve (better known among us as Midsummer) in order to protect cattle from sickness caused by sorcery. In England, putting mullein under the butter churn could bring back butter that had been witched away. European travelers carried mullein or stuffed it into their shoes to protect them from attacks by wild animals (and also to make walking more comfortable). Nowadays, dream pillows are stuffed with mullein to protect against nightmares. It is mixed with dill, salt, and fennel and sprinkled around haunted areas to repel malicious spirits or ghosts, and it is a substitution for graveyard dirt in the recipes of various spells.

This magic herb also has various connections to the idea of returning, which we can see as a Saturnian power (emphasizing borders and staying inside them). For instance, in Great Britain it was used to help bring back children who had been kidnapped by fairies. Various Native Americans knew a good thing when they saw it and used this Eurasian native that became naturalized in North America to return people to their right mind. For instance, the Hopi mixed the leaves with osnomodium to be used as a smoke by crazy people and those who had been betwitched. The Navajo wrapped the leaves in a corn husk to be smoked to help a mind return if it was lost, and the Potowatami smudged unconcscious people with the leaves to help them return to consciousness. Consider mullein useful in centering the spirit and add it to the pipe smoked as an aid to astral work.

Mullein was also a ceremonial smoke for the Isleta and Thompson Indians. I read mention in various sources on the web that mullein is one of Woden’s Nine Herbs, but looking the actual charm, I don’t think so.

Many disagree about the planetary correspondence of this magick herb. Agrippa said it belonged to Mercury. The leaves do have a high concentration of aluminum, a Mercury metal, and in the past this herb was given to affect the mind, for instance, to bring back people who were unconscious or who were mentally ill. Culpeper thought it was a Saturn herb, on account of its medicinal actions. As a biennial, it is also a slow herb (slowness is a Saturnian quality),  taking a year to produce a rosette of leaves and only flowering in the second year. The seeds likewise show a Saturnian slowness in their long viability - up to 35 years. It also has a Saturnian love for borders, growing along roads, train tracks, or on the edge of woodlands, and for areas that are rejected for agricultural purposes (“waste lands”). Some argue that it is a Fire herb, because its dry leaves make an excellent tinder and it gets one its common names, hag’s taper, from the practice of dipping the stalks in fat to make a quickie torch (by the way, the “hag” in “hag’s taper” was originally the word “hedge”). Finally, the leaves contain iron and the fuzz that covers them is a softer version of prickliness, so this can also be viewed as a Mars herb. Indeed, it has played a part in various Mars-ruled activities, such as hunting: Navajo hunters rubbed a tea of mullein leaf on themselves and their horses for strength.


In ancient Rome, women used mullein flowers to give their hair yellow highlights. It’s said that Quaker women, who were not allowed to use makeup, rubbed their faces with the leaves to make them rosy - the fuzz is irritating to some people. The Atsugewei rubbed their bodies with mullein leaves during sweat lodges. The Abnaki made a necklace for teething babies from the root. A tea from this herb is slightly sedating; boil 1 tablespoon of dried leaves or root (or for a sweeter tea, the fresh or dried flowers) in 1 cup of water for 5-10 minutes, then strain through a coffee filter to remove the hairs, if using the leaves. The leaves were smoked in the past to soothe irritation caused by coughing from TB, asthma, or general lung irritation. The leaves also contain a small amount of rotenone, an organic pesticide. Birds enjoy eating the seeds. This plant has many, many names: it is also known as Aaron’s rod, Adam’s flannel, beggar’s blanket, beggar’s flannel, beggar’s stalk, big taper, blanket herb, blanket leaf, bullock’s lungwort, candlewick plant, clot, clown’s lungwort, cow’s lungwort, cuddy’s lungs, devil’s-tobacco, duffle, feltwort, flannel leaf, flannel plant, fluffweed, graveyeard candles, great mullein, hag’s taper, hare’s beard, hedge-taper, ice leaf, Jacob’s staff, Jupiter’s staff, lungwort, lus mor [great herb], miner’s candle, mullein, mullein dock, old man’s flannel, Our Lady’s flannel, Quaker rouge, rag paper, shepherd’s club, shepherd’s staff, St. Peter’s staff, torches, torchwort, velvet dock, velvet plant, white man’s-footsteps, wild ice leaf, witch’s candles, witch’s taper, woolen, and wooly mullein.”

– Alchemy Works

"Mullein protects and controls: it also causes penis captivus.
Against Enemies, Wild Animals, and Demons: Keep a packet of mullein
under the pillow to prevent nightmares. Wear the leaves in your shoes or bathe for five days in mullein tea to engender courage and drive away enemies or wild animals. When burned with a mixture of Psychic Vision Incense and Commanding Incense, mullein smoke is a powerful adjunct to casting spells against foes. Mullein mixed with graveyard dirt and red pepper appears in some recipes for Goofer Dust, which is used to jinx enemies.


Magical Candles To Control Demons: If you lack candles, dip mullein
stalks in oil or tallow and bum them as a substitute. Mullein grows quite
tall and is magically potent, so a circle of six-foot-tall “witches’ candles” is
considered of assistance, if you are summoning spirits into an outdoor circle, for if the spirits can be conjured, the circle of smoking mullein torches will bring them under your command. and you can rule them.


To Catch an Adulterous Lover: If you suspect your partner of having another lover. get a short length of mullein stalk and keep it on you. When your lover urinates outdoors, stick the mullein stalk down into the pool of
urine and leave it there. If someone else has intercourse with your lover. the
pair will get stuck like dogs, and you will be able to catch them in the act.


Medical uses: Mullein is used in herbal medicine to relieve asthma.
Botanical Notes: Some European-American authors and unscrupulous merchants have claimed that mullein is a legitimate substitute for graveyard dirt, which it absolutely is not. Mullein is powerful in Its own right, and can
supplement graveyard dirt, but It was only introduced to African people in
America, while veneration of the dead is endemic in African religions, and thus working with graveyard dirt, “corpse powder:’ and the bones of the dead is of important and ancient provenance in African-American religio-magical traditions.”

– Catherine Yronwode, Hoodoo Herb and Root Magic

61 notes

larpcouture:

Happy DIY Friday! Today’s tutorial is how to make a caterpillar sinnet- a pretty way to store paracord or make a decorative rope. This would be a neat touch for the many modern and post-apocalyptic larps, and with the right color cord, I could even see using is as “elven rope”. Enjoy!

16 notes

epicedc:

I don’t wear any accessories really… I don’t even carry or wear a watch…
But if I was to wear a bracelet, it would have to be the Adjustable paracord hexnut bracelet from tbcparacord.com

epicedc:

I don’t wear any accessories really… I don’t even carry or wear a watch…

But if I was to wear a bracelet, it would have to be the Adjustable paracord hexnut bracelet from tbcparacord.com

43 notes

survivethrive:

SPOOL TOOL TM

A simple multifunctional device to store and work paracord. Holds up to 100 ft. of 550 Paracord, with everything you need to store, cut, and heat seal the ends.​

Innovation.

​The Spool Tool was an idea born out in the field. While watching a group of people work with paracord, I noticed the difficulties everyone was having with the paracord unraveling, getting tangled up, knotting, and generally becoming a big pain to handle. Then came the added problem of keeping your blade/scissors and lighter close at hand. Unexpectedly, the idea for a tool to manage it all was born…the Spool Tool. (via <a href=”http://www.spooltool.us/#!home/mainPage/cquc/i151ir2”>Spool Tool, Paracord Tool, Tricorne, Tricorn, Paracord Management,</a>)

123 notes